Maine Revised Statutes

§403. Insurance by assenting employer; requirements as to self-insurers

An employer subject to this Act shall secure compensation and other benefits to the employer's employees in one or more of the ways described in this section. The failure of any employer subject to this Act to procure insurance coverage for the payment of compensation and other benefits to the employer's employees in one of the ways described in this section constitutes failure to secure payment of compensation provided for by this Act within the meaning of section 324, subsection 3 and subjects the employer to the penalties prescribed by that section. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]

1. Insuring under workers' compensation insurance policy.  The employer may comply with this section by insuring and keeping insured the payment of such compensation and other benefits under a workers' compensation insurance policy. The insurance company shall file with the board notice, in the form required by the board, of the issuance of any workers' compensation policy to an employer. The insurance may not be cancelled within the time limited in such policy for its expiration until at least 30 days after the insurance company mails to the board and to the employer a notice of the cancellation of the insurance. In the event that the employer has obtained a workers' compensation policy from another insurance company, or has otherwise secured compensation as provided in this section, and such insurance or other security becomes effective prior to the expiration of the 30-day notice period, cancellation takes effect on the effective date of the other insurance or on receipt of security.
[ 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF) .]
2. Pilot projects. 
[ 2001, c. 48, §1 (AMD); 2001, c. 48, §2 (AFF); MRSA T. 39-A, §403, sub-§2, ¶ D (RP) .]
3. Proof of solvency and financial ability to pay; trust.  The employer may comply with this section by furnishing satisfactory proof to the Superintendent of Insurance of solvency and financial ability to pay the compensation and benefits, and depositing cash, satisfactory securities, irrevocable standby letters of credit issued by a qualified financial institution or a surety bond with the superintendent, in such sum as the superintendent may determine pursuant to subsection 8, the Treasurer of State to be listed as beneficiary of the bond or the irrevocable standby letter of credit and the bond or the irrevocable standby letter of credit to be conditional upon the faithful performance of this Act relating to the payment of compensation and benefits to any injured employee. In case of cash or securities being deposited, or drawn on a surety bond or letter of credit, the cash or securities must be placed in an account at interest by the Treasurer of State, and the accumulation of interest on the cash or securities so deposited must be credited to the account and may not be paid to the employer to the extent that the interest is required to secure the employer's self-insurance obligations, including the amount needed to support any present value discounting in the determination of the amount of the deposit. Any security deposit must be held by the Treasurer of State in trust for the benefit of the self-insurer's employees for the purposes of making payments under this Act. If the superintendent determines that the self-insurer has experienced a deterioration in financial condition that adversely affects the self-insurer's ability to pay obligations under this Act, the security amount may be in excess of the minimum amount required by this Title.
A self-insurer may, with the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance, use the following types of security to satisfy the self-insurer's responsibility to post security required by the superintendent: a surety bond; an irrevocable standby letter of credit; cash deposits and acceptable securities; and an actuarially determined fully funded trust. For purposes of this section, "tangible net worth" means equity less assets that have no physical existence and depend on expected future benefits for their ascribed value. Unless disapproved by the superintendent pursuant to paragraph C, subparagraphs (5) and (6), a group self-insurer that maintains a trust actuarially funded to the confidence level required by the superintendent may use an irrevocable standby letter of credit as follows: only in an amount not greater than the difference between the funding to the required confidence level and funding to the confidence level reduced by 10 percentage points; only as long as the trust assets are not used as collateral for the letter of credit; and only as long as the value of trust assets, excluding the value of the letter of credit, is at least equal to the present value, evaluated to the 65% confidence level, of ultimate incurred claims, claims settlement costs and, if determined necessary by the superintendent, administrative costs.
A. An individual self-insurer providing an irrevocable standby letter of credit as security shall file with the Superintendent of Insurance a letter of credit, on a form approved by the superintendent, copies of any agreements or other documents establishing the terms and conditions of the employer's reimbursement obligations to the financial institution issuing the letter of credit, together with copies of any required security agreements, mortgages or other agreements or documents granting security for the employer's reimbursement obligations and any other agreements that contain conditions, restrictions or limitations of any kind upon the employer, the superintendent or the Treasurer of State. The form of letter of credit approved by the superintendent must include, but is not limited to, all terms specifically required by this subsection and all terms reasonably required to secure the payment of compensation and benefits to claimants as required under this Act.
In order to issue an irrevocable standby letter of credit as security under this paragraph, a financial institution or its parent company must either:
(1) Maintain a long-term unsecured debt rating of at least A by either Moody's Investors Service, Inc. or Standard and Poor's Corporation;
(2) Maintain a short-term commercial paper rating within the 3 highest categories established by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. or Standard and Poor's Corporation; or
(3) Be certified in writing by the Superintendent of Financial Institutions to be well capitalized and well managed in accordance with the criteria set forth in Title 9-B, section 446-A, subsections 1 and 2. The Superintendent of Insurance shall keep the certification confidential, except from the subject financial institution, in accordance with Title 9-B, section 226.
The Superintendent of Insurance may adopt rules to establish additional qualifications for financial institutions issuing irrevocable standby letters of credit. Rules adopted pursuant to this paragraph are routine technical rules pursuant to Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter 2-A.
The irrevocable standby letter of credit must be the individual obligation of the issuing financial institution, may not be subject to any agreement, condition, qualification or defense between the financial institution and the employer and may not in any way be contingent on reimbursement by the employer. If the rating of an issuing financial institution that has issued an irrevocable standby letter of credit pursuant to this section falls below the required standard, the employer shall obtain a new irrevocable standby letter of credit from a qualified financial institution or shall provide other eligible security of equal value approved by the Superintendent of Insurance. The irrevocable standby letter of credit is automatically extended for one year from the date of expiration unless, 90 days prior to any expiration date, the issuing financial institution notifies the Superintendent of Insurance that the financial institution elects not to renew the irrevocable standby letter of credit.
An irrevocable standby letter of credit that has been issued by a qualified financial institution and accepted by the Superintendent of Insurance binds the issuing financial institution to pay one or more drafts drawn by the Treasurer of State, as directed by the superintendent, as long as the draft does not exceed the total amount of the irrevocable standby letter of credit. Any draft presented by the Treasurer of State, as directed by the superintendent, must be promptly honored if accompanied by the certification of the superintendent that any obligation under this chapter has not been paid when due or that a proceeding in bankruptcy has been initiated by or with respect to the employer in a court of competent jurisdiction.
If the Superintendent of Insurance certifies that the superintendent has been notified by the issuing financial institution that the irrevocable standby letter of credit expires by its terms in 30 days or less and that the irrevocable standby letter of credit was not replaced within 15 days after that notice to the superintendent by other eligible security of equal value approved by the superintendent, then the financial institution must remit within 15 days the full amount of the irrevocable letter of credit to the Treasurer of State without further certification.
Any proceeds from a draw on such an irrevocable standby letter of credit by the Treasurer of State, as directed by the Superintendent of Insurance, must be held by the Treasurer of State on behalf of workers' compensation claimants to secure payment of claims until either the superintendent authorizes the Treasurer of State to release those proceeds to the employer upon provision by the employer of replacement security adequate to meet the requirements for security set by the superintendent or the superintendent directs distribution of the proceeds in accordance with this Title.
To the extent not inconsistent with state law, the letter of credit is subject to and governed by the International Standby Practices 1998 or successor practices governing standby letters of credit duly adopted by the International Chamber of Commerce. If any legal proceedings are initiated with respect to payment of the letter of credit, those proceedings are subject to the State's courts and law. [2011, c. 180, §1 (AMD).]
B. The Superintendent of Insurance shall prescribe the form of the surety bond that may be used to satisfy, in whole or in part, the self-insurer's responsibility under this section to post security. The bond must be continuous, be subject to nonrenewal only upon not less than 60 days' notice to the superintendent, cover payment of all present and future liabilities incurred under this Act while the bond is in force and cover payments that become due while the bond is in force that are attributable to injuries incurred in prior periods and otherwise unsecured by cash, irrevocable standby letters of credit or acceptable securities. A bond must be held until all payments secured by the bond have been made or until the bond has been replaced by other eligible security approved by the superintendent that covers all outstanding liabilities. Payments under the bond are due within 30 days after notice has been given to the surety by the board that the principal has failed to make a payment required under the terms of an award, agreement or governing law. A trust established to satisfy the requirements of this section may not be funded by a surety bond. [2007, c. 75, §1 (AMD).]
C. A self-insurer may establish an actuarially determined fully funded trust, funded at a level sufficient to discharge those obligations incurred by the employer pursuant to this Act as they become due and payable from time to time, as long as the Superintendent of Insurance requires that the value of trust assets be at least equal to the present value of ultimate expected incurred claims and claims settlement costs, plus required safety margins and, if determined necessary by the superintendent, administrative costs for the operation of the plan of self-insurance. For the purpose of determining whether an actuarially determined fully funded trust has a surplus of funds in excess of that required by this subsection, the superintendent shall consider, based upon the group's audit for all completed plan years, only the following assets held outside the trust account: cash up to $10,000; accounts receivable, limited to amounts collected and deposited in the trust account by the date of the surplus distribution; accrued interest on trust account assets that will be collected and deposited in the trust account within 6 months from the date of the surplus determination; tangible assets that will be converted to cash and deposited in the trust account prior to the distribution date of any surplus; and a letter of credit to be used to partially fund the trust to the extent allowed under this section and rules adopted by the superintendent, as supported in the actuarial review. The superintendent shall consider cash held outside the trust account in excess of $10,000 if the self-insurer provides, to the superintendent's satisfaction, documentation regarding why the money is being held outside the trust account. An actuarially determined fully funded trust must be funded as follows, as determined by the superintendent.
(1) For individual and group self-insurers, the amount of security must be determined based upon an actuarial review. The actuarial review must take into consideration the use by a group self-insurer of any irrevocable standby letter of credit. Except as provided in subparagraph (3), initial funding for each plan year must be maintained at the 90% or higher confidence level. Funding after the completion of the initial plan year may be established no lower than the 75% confidence level if the following has occurred:
(a) A year considered for reduction is completed;
(b) The supporting actuarial review includes an evaluation of the completed year experience with claims evaluated not less than 6 months from the end of the plan year, or in the case of a group self-insurer in existence for at least 36 months, not less than 4 months from the end of the plan year; and
(c) For individual self-insurers, prior approval from the superintendent is obtained.
For the purposes of determining the confidence level, all completed years at the same confidence level may be aggregated. For individual self-insurers, funds may not be released from the trust or transferred between years except as approved by the superintendent. The governing body of a group self-insurer may at any time declare a surplus of funds above the required confidence level, but may only release funds after the completion of any plan year. The superintendent may request information regarding any such declaration. Any distribution of surplus must be based upon an actuarial review of all outstanding obligations for all completed plan years, an audited financial statement of the group for all completed plan years and a surplus distribution worksheet for all completed plan years on a form approved by the superintendent. The group self-insurer must provide the required information within 10 days after the distribution. Any surplus declared or distributed pursuant to this paragraph is subject to adjustment after review by the superintendent within 60 days of the receipt of the required information. Any deficit below the required confidence level, as determined by the superintendent, that results from a distribution under this paragraph must be funded within 45 days from the date of the notice by the superintendent.
(2) A group self-insurer may elect to fund at a higher confidence level through the use of cash, marketable securities or reinsurance. If a member of a group self-insurer terminates membership in the group for any reason, that member shall fund the member's proportionate share of the liabilities and obligations of the trust to the 95% confidence level. If for any reason the departing member fails to fund the member's proportionate share of the trust's exposure to the 95% level of confidence, the trust is responsible for that member's liabilities and obligations to the trust. If the superintendent finds that a material risk to the trust's ability to satisfy its liabilities and obligations in full exists due to the failure of one or more departing members to fund the departing members' proportionate share of those liabilities and obligations to the 95% confidence level or due to the failure of the group trust to enforce the funding requirement, the superintendent shall consider the unfunded share of the trust's exposure when approving a determination of a surplus or deficit in the trust.
(3) Subject to prior approval by the superintendent in accordance with subparagraph (5), a self-insurer that has successfully maintained an actuarially determined fully funded trust for a period of 5 or more consecutive years may fund all years, including the prospective fund year, at the 75% or higher confidence level in the aggregate and a group self-insurer that has successfully maintained an actuarially determined fully funded trust for a period of 10 or more consecutive years may fund all years, including the prospective fund year, at the 65% or higher confidence level in the aggregate.
(4) Trust assets must consist of cash or marketable securities of a type and risk character as specified in subsection 9. The trustee shall submit a report to the superintendent not less frequently than quarterly that lists the assets comprising the corpus of the trust, including a statement of their market value and the investment activity during the period covered by the report. The trust must be established and maintained subject to the condition that trust assets may not be transferred or revert in any manner to the employer except to the extent that the superintendent finds that the value of the trust assets exceeds the present value of incurred claims and claims settlement costs with an actuarially indicated margin for future loss development. In all other respects, the trust instrument, including terms for certification, funding, designation of trustee and payout, must be as approved by the superintendent, except that the value of the trust account must be actuarially calculated at least annually by a casualty actuary who is a member of the American Academy of Actuaries and adjusted to the required level of funding.
(5) In determining whether a self-insurer that maintains an actuarially determined fully funded trust qualifies for a reduction in the required confidence level pursuant to subparagraph (1) or (3) or is subject to an enhanced confidence level pursuant to subparagraph (6), the superintendent shall consider the financial condition of the self-insurer in relation to the potential workers' compensation liabilities. The factors the superintendent may consider include the self-insurer's liquidity, leverage, tangible net worth, size and net income. For group self-insurers, the superintendent's review must be based on the aggregate financial condition of the group members. At the request of the superintendent, a group self-insurer shall report relevant financial information, on a form prescribed by the superintendent, at such intervals as the superintendent directs. The superintendent may establish additional review criteria or procedures by rule. Rules adopted pursuant to this subparagraph are routine technical rules as defined in Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter 2-A.
(6) If the superintendent determines, based on an evaluation of a self-insurer's financial condition pursuant to subparagraph (5), that the confidence level at which the self-insurer has been authorized to fund its trust is not sufficient to provide adequate security for the self-insurer's reasonably anticipated potential workers' compensation liabilities, the superintendent shall make a determination of the appropriate confidence level and order the self-insurer to take prompt action to increase funding to that level within 60 days. [2011, c. 98, §1 (AMD).]
D. Notwithstanding any provision of this chapter, authorization to self-insure may not be conditioned on a bond or security deposit that is in excess of $50,000 for the State, the University of Maine System or any county, city or town with a state-assessed valuation equal to or in excess of $300,000,000 and either a bond rating equal to or in excess of the 2nd highest standard as set by a national bond rating agency or a net worth equal to or in excess of $35,000,000. If a county, city or town that is a self-insurer relies upon a bond rating to qualify under this paragraph, it shall value or cause to be valued its unpaid workers' compensation claims pursuant to sound accepted actuarial principles. This value must be incorporated in the annual audit of the county, city or town, together with disclosure of funds appropriated to discharge incurred claims expenses. [1997, c. 126, §7 (AMD).]
E. In consideration of a self-insuring entity's application for authorization to operate a plan of self-insurance, the Superintendent of Insurance may require or permit an applicant to employ valid risk transfer by the utilization of primary reinsurance, subject to the provisions of subsection 8. Standards respecting the application of reinsurance must be contained in a rule adopted by the superintendent pursuant to the Maine Administrative Procedure Act. Reinsurance must be defined as insurance covering workers' compensation exposures in excess of risk retained by a self-insurer. [1995, c. 398, §2 (NEW).]
F. An employer may be eligible for approved self-insurance status pursuant to this Act if the employer submits a written guarantee of the obligations incurred pursuant to this Act, the guarantee to be issued by a United States or Canadian corporation that is a member of an affiliated group of which the employer is a member, and which corporation is solvent and demonstrates an ability to pay the compensation and benefits, and the guarantee is in a form acceptable to the Superintendent of Insurance. The guarantor shall provide audited annual financial statements and such other information as the superintendent may require, including quarterly financial statements, and the employer shall provide a cash deposit, satisfactory securities, irrevocable standby letters of credit issued by a qualified financial institution or a surety bond as otherwise required by this Act in an amount not less than $100,000. The guarantor is deemed to have submitted to the jurisdiction of the board and the courts of this State for purposes of enforcing the guarantee. The guarantor, in all respects, is bound by and subject to the orders, findings, decisions or awards rendered against the employer for payment of compensation and any penalties or forfeitures provided under this Act. The superintendent, following hearing, may revoke the self-insured status of the employer if at any time the assets of the guarantor become impaired or encumbered or are otherwise found to be inadequate to support the guarantee. [1995, c. 398, §2 (NEW).]
G. A subsidiary employer may be eligible for approved self-insurance status pursuant to this Act if: the subsidiary employer files an application jointly with a qualified parent corporation that has direct ownership of a majority voting interest of the subsidiary employer; the parent corporation and subsidiary employer submit an irrevocable contract of assignment, on a form approved by the Superintendent of Insurance, of the subsidiary employer's obligations incurred pursuant to this Act; the parent corporation is solvent and demonstrates an ability to pay the compensation and benefits of the subsidiary employer; and the subsidiary employer meets all other requirements for application and qualification as a self-insurer under this chapter and under any applicable rules adopted by the superintendent. If the parent corporation is not a United States corporation, the superintendent may, in the superintendent's sole discretion, establish the conditions of any approval of the foreign parent corporation or deny the application of the foreign parent corporation. As part of its application for approval, a foreign parent corporation must provide the following information to the superintendent: evidence that its country of domicile has substantially similar laws with respect to submission to the jurisdiction of the board and the courts of this State for the purposes of payment of workers' compensation claims of the subsidiary employer; audited financial statements, as otherwise required by this Act, prepared in the English language by a certified public accountant licensed in a state in the United States in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards as prescribed by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants; and security, as otherwise required by the Act, in United States currency. The irrevocable contract of assignment and application must be signed by a duly authorized officer of each corporation and the application must include a board of directors' resolution from each entity as evidence of each officer's authority to enter into the contract. The superintendent may determine the subsidiary employer's eligibility for self-insurance authority and the amount of required security based upon the parent corporation's consolidated financial statement, as long as the employer complies with paragraph H. A subsidiary employer currently authorized to self-insure need not pay the application fee required of a new applicant in order to file an application to qualify under this subsection, but the subsidiary employer and parent corporation must provide all information required under this subsection as if they were a new applicant. Once the subsidiary employer becomes authorized to self-insure under this section, the parent corporation assumes liability for all prior workers' compensation liabilities incurred by the subsidiary employer during the period of self-insurance prior to the date of authorization under this subsection, unless the subsidiary employer files an alternative plan approved by the superintendent. The parent corporation and the subsidiary employer must both be named on the certificate of authorization for self-insurance authority. Upon issuance of a certificate of authorization pursuant to this subsection, the following applies.
(1) The parent corporation is deemed to have submitted to the jurisdiction of the board and the courts of the State for the purposes of payment of workers' compensation claims of the subsidiary employer and is deemed to have submitted to the jurisdiction of the superintendent for purposes of implementation of this Act. The parent corporation, in all respects, is bound by and subject to all orders, findings, decisions or awards rendered against the subsidiary employer for payment of compensation and any penalties or forfeitures provided under this Act.
(2) A subsidiary employer authorized under this subsection and the parent corporation are considered one employer for the purposes of membership in the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. In the event of termination, transfer, insolvency, dissolution or bankruptcy of a subsidiary employer qualifying under this subsection, the parent corporation assumes all assessment obligations of the subsidiary employer for its period of self-insurance and is not considered a new member of the association.
(3) If the subsidiary employer fails for any reason to pay compensation and benefits as required under this Act, the parent corporation stands in the place of the subsidiary employer and is deemed to be the employer, subject to all requirements and provisions of this Act. For the purposes of payment of benefits and compensation under this Act, an employee of the subsidiary employer is deemed to be concurrently employed by both corporations. Concerning notification of injury to an employee of the subsidiary employer, notice to or knowledge of the occurrence of the injury on the part of the subsidiary employer is deemed notice or knowledge on the part of the parent corporation. The transfer, insolvency, dissolution or bankruptcy of a subsidiary employer qualifying under this subsection does not relieve the parent corporation from payment of compensation for injuries or death sustained by an employee during the time the subsidiary employer was approved for self-insurance authority under this subsection and the parent corporation continues to be deemed an employer until such time as all outstanding workers' compensation claims have been discharged.
(4) The transfer, insolvency, dissolution or bankruptcy of a parent corporation causes the termination of the subsidiary employer's authorization to self-insure and a termination plan must be filed pursuant to subsection 14. [1995, c. 398, §2 (NEW).]
H. Each individual self-insurer shall submit with its application, and not less frequently than annually thereafter, a financial statement of current origin that has been audited by a certified public accountant. When a self-insurer qualifies on the basis of a financial guarantee or on the basis of an irrevocable contract of assignment, the Superintendent of Insurance may accept an audited financial statement of the guarantor or parent corporation in satisfaction of this requirement and may also require combining statements provided in an array that is reconciled to the consolidated report. [1995, c. 398, §2 (NEW).]
[ 2011, c. 98, §1 (AMD); 2011, c. 180, §1 (AMD) .]
4. Group self-insurers; application.  Except for the provision relating to individual public employer self-insurers, subsection 3 is equally applicable in all respects to group self-insurers. Any employer or group of employers desiring to become a self-insurer shall submit to the Superintendent of Insurance with an application for self-insurance, in a form prescribed by the superintendent, the following:
A. A payroll report for each participating employer of the group for the 3 preceding annual fiscal periods; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
B. A report of compensation losses incurred, payments plus reserves, by each participating employer of the group for the periods described in paragraph A; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
C. A sworn itemized statement of the group's assets and liabilities; satisfactory proof of financial ability to pay compensation for the employers participating in the group plan; and the group's reserves, their source and assurance of continuance; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
D. A description of the safety organization maintained by the employer or group for the prevention of injuries; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
E. A statement showing the kind of operations performed or to be performed; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
F. An indemnity agreement in a form prescribed by the superintendent that jointly and severally binds the group and each member to comply with the provisions of this Act; and [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
G. Any other agreements, contracts or other pertinent documents relating to the organization of the employers in the group. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
If, upon examination of the sworn financial statement and other data submitted, the superintendent is satisfied as to the ability of the employer or group to make current compensation payments and that the employer's or group's tangible assets make reasonably certain the payment of all obligations that may arise under this Act, the application must be granted subject to the terms and conditions setting out the exposure of cash deposits or securities or an acceptable surety bond, as required by the superintendent. Except to the extent provided in subsection 4-A, security against shock or catastrophe loss must be provided either by depositing securities with the board in such amount as the superintendent may determine or by filing with the superintendent and the board an insurance carrier's certificate of a standard self-insurer's reinsurance contract issued to the self-insurer or group in a form approved by the superintendent, providing coverage against losses arising out of one occurrence in such amounts as the superintendent may determine, or a combination of the foregoing, satisfactory to the superintendent. Notwithstanding any provision of this chapter, no specific or aggregate reinsurance may be required of any individual public employer that is self-insured and qualifies for the alternative security requirements of subsection 3, paragraph D.
Yearly reports in a form prescribed by the superintendent must be filed by each self-insurer or group. The superintendent may, in addition, require the filing of quarterly financial status reports whenever the superintendent has reason to believe that there has been a deterioration in the financial condition of either an individual or group self-insurer that adversely affects the individual's or group's ability to pay expected losses. The reports must be filed within 30 days after the superintendent's request or at such time as the superintendent shall otherwise set.
After approving any application for self-insurance, the superintendent shall promptly notify the board and forward to it copies of the application and all supporting materials.
[ 2003, c. 315, §1 (AMD) .]
4-A. Group self-insurance reinsurance account.   As an alternative to obtaining a reinsurance contract providing coverage against losses arising out of one occurrence,  an individual or group self-insurer authorized under this section may, with the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance, participate in a group self-insurance reinsurance account, referred to in this subsection as "an account," as provided in this subsection. A group self-insurer authorized under the laws of another state may participate in an account through a protected cell arrangement as provided in paragraph L. More than one account may be established pursuant to this subsection. An account established pursuant to this subsection may be established as either an independent private entity or an instrumentality of the State, but the debts and liabilities of an account established as an instrumentality of the State are not debts and liabilities of the State. An account established as an instrumentality of the State within 24 months of its formation, with the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance, may transfer all of its assets and liabilities into an account established as an independent private entity.
A. A group self-insurer that is subject to joint and several liability pursuant to subsection 4, paragraph F, a group self-insurer authorized under the laws of another state and that executes an agreement that its members will be jointly and severally liable in accordance with the provisions of paragraph L or an individual self-insurer authorized under this section that executes an agreement to be responsible for contingent assessment liability in accordance with the provisions of paragraph F may apply to reinsure through an account.
(1) Upon the petition of 4 or more authorized group self-insurers, the Superintendent of Insurance may approve an account for the deposit of funds in lieu of reinsurance.
(2) The account must indemnify its participating self-insurer members for claims incurred during the account's operation. The purpose of the account is to accumulate funds to provide coverage against losses arising out of one occurrence in excess of established retention levels consistent with the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B.
(3) A self-insurer is deemed to be a member of the account for reinsurance coverage for purposes of a claim if the self-insurer is a member of the account when an injury occurs or a covered occupational disease loss is incurred.
(4) A self-insurer that reinsures through an account shall continue to make payments into that account in accordance with the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B.
(5) A self-insurer's participation in an account is considered as a component of the self-insurer's renewal application. A self-insurer's membership in an account is considered adequate protection against losses arising out of a single occurrence unless the Superintendent of Insurance determines, after considering the financial condition and catastrophic loss exposure of both the self-insurer and the account, that it is necessary to maintain additional reinsurance protection, maintain a lower self-insured retention level or provide some other form of additional security, singly or in combination. [2013, c. 172, §1 (AMD).]
B. An account must operate in accordance with a plan of operation established by the group self-insurer members and approved by the Superintendent of Insurance.
(1) Those group self-insurers creating an account shall submit to the Superintendent of Insurance a plan of operation and any amendments to it that are necessary to ensure the fair, reasonable and equitable administration of the account. The plan of operation is effective upon approval by the superintendent. Any amendments subsequent to the plan's initial approval must be submitted to the superintendent by the plan's board of directors and are effective upon approval by the superintendent.
(2) The plan of operation must:
(a) Create a board of directors and initial bylaws, including the terms and conditions of board membership and the manner by which board members are initially appointed and are replaced when vacancies occur;
(b) Establish the procedures by which all the powers and duties of the account are performed, including, but not limited to, defining the date and conditions pursuant to which the account will commence coverage for claims by participating group self-insurer members and establishing provisions for determining limits of exposure for the account;
(c) Establish procedures for handling assets of a fund created pursuant to paragraph C;
(d) Establish underwriting rules and criteria by which rates are to be established;
(e) Establish procedures by which claims may be filed with the account;
(f) Establish an investment policy for a fund created pursuant to paragraph C;
(g) Establish procedures for records to be kept of all financial transactions of the account, its agents and the board of directors;
(h) Establish procedures for withdrawal from the account by a self-insurer member, which must, at a minimum, require 90 days' notice from the withdrawing self-insurer member to the board of directors and the Superintendent of Insurance;
(i) Establish, subject to approval by the Superintendent of Insurance, a minimum level of funding to be achieved by the account;
(j) Contain additional provisions necessary or proper for the execution of the powers and duties of the board of directors and the ability of the account to meet its obligations; and
(k) Establish a standard per occurrence retention level for claims covered by the account. [2013, c. 172, §1 (AMD).]
C. The bylaws of an account established pursuant to this subsection must establish the powers and duties of the board of directors of an account and must include the authority:
(1) To administer a self-insurance specific reinsurance account fund, to be known in this subsection as "a fund," which must receive payments from participating self-insurer members of the account as required by paragraph A. The costs of administration by the board of directors and expenses of the account must be borne by the fund;
(2) In its discretion, to secure reinsurance for the fund's exposure and to otherwise invest the assets of the fund to effectuate the purpose of the account, subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance;
(3) To accept or reject applications of self-insurers to be underwritten by the account, subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance;
(4) To accept or reject applications of a self-insurer member to self-insure any exposure for one occurrence at a level other than the standard retention level provided in the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B, subject to:
(a) Compliance with applicable provisions of the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B;
(b) Notice to and prior approval by the Superintendent of Insurance; and
(c) For other retention levels, a statement from that member's actuary that the member has adequately funded its additional exposure;
(5) To create a mechanism for assessing participating self-insurer members if funds are insufficient to pay the claims of the account;
(6) To retain actuarial assistance to be used in the establishment of loss reserves, reinsurance and risk management for the account, and in the development of underwriting criteria and premium rates for self-insurer members. Rates are subject to approval by the Superintendent of Insurance;
(7) To associate with a participating self-insurer member in the defense, investigation or settlement of any claim, suit or proceeding that appears to involve indemnity by the account. This authority does not create a duty to investigate, handle, settle or defend any claims, suits or proceedings against a self-insurer member;
(8) To borrow funds;
(9) To amend the bylaws and plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B, subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance; and
(10) To exercise such other powers as are established in the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B. [2013, c. 172, §1 (AMD).]
D. An account is subject to examination and regulation by the Superintendent of Insurance. The board of directors of an account shall submit, within 120 days after the close of each fiscal year, an audited financial report and an actuarial report for the preceding fiscal year in a form approved by the superintendent. When the superintendent considers it necessary, the superintendent may require an account to maintain specific or aggregate reinsurance at such retention levels as the superintendent determines to be appropriate. [2003, c. 315, §2 (NEW).]
E. The Superintendent of Insurance may address any deficiency in reserves, assets or reinsurance of an account in accordance with this paragraph.
(1) The Superintendent of Insurance may conduct, upon reasonable notice, an examination to determine the financial condition of an account. An examiner duly qualified by the superintendent may examine the loss reserves, assets, liabilities, excess insurance and working capital of an account. If the superintendent finds that the reserves, excess insurance or assets may be inadequate, or that an account does not have working capital in an amount establishing the financial strength and liquidity of an account to pay claims promptly and showing evidence of the financial ability of an account to meet its obligations to self-insurer members, the superintendent shall notify an account of the inadequacy. Upon notification, the account within 30 days, or such other time as the superintendent approves, shall file with the superintendent its written plan specifying remedial action to be taken and the time frame for implementation of that plan.
(2) If the Superintendent of Insurance determines, after reviewing the information filed pursuant to paragraph D, that a hazardous financial condition exists, the superintendent shall notify an account of the condition. Upon notification, an account shall implement within 30 days, or such other time as the superintendent approves, its plan to correct any deficiencies and within 90 days shall file with the superintendent proof of remedial action taken. If the superintendent is satisfied that the plan submitted to improve the inadequate condition of an account is sufficient, the superintendent shall notify the account. The account shall report quarterly to the superintendent until any deficiencies and their causes have been corrected.
(3) The Superior Court may appoint the Superintendent of Insurance to act as receiver, in the same manner as for a delinquent insurer pursuant to Title 24-A, section 4360, if the superintendent proves by clear and convincing evidence that a hazardous financial condition exists and that an account is unable or unwilling to take meaningful corrective action. [2009, c. 232, §2 (AMD).]
F. A self-insurer's liability for participating in an account is governed by this paragraph.
(1) Each participating self-insurer in an account has a contingent assessment liability in accordance with the plan of operation established pursuant to paragraph B for payment of claims and expenses incurred while a member of the account and must execute an agreement acknowledging that it is responsible for the prompt payment of all assessments necessary to ensure that the account is fully funded and that, if any participant in the account fails to pay an assessment when due for any reason, the remaining participants are liable for the shortfall.
(2) Each contract or other document certifying participation in the account, issued by the account, must contain a statement of the contingent liability of participating self-insurers. [2009, c. 232, §2 (AMD).]
G. An account is exempt from payment of all fees and all taxes levied by this State or any of its subdivisions, except taxes levied on real or personal property. [2003, c. 315, §2 (NEW).]
H. This subsection does not create any liability on the part of, and a cause of action of any nature does not arise against, any self-insurer member, an account or its agents or employees, the board of directors of an account or its individual members or the Superintendent of Insurance or the superintendent's representatives for any acts or omissions taken by them in the performance of their powers and duties under this subsection. The immunity established by this subsection does not extend to willful neglect or malfeasance that would otherwise be actionable. [2009, c. 232, §2 (AMD).]
I. Assets of an account's fund may be used exclusively for payment of expenses of the account and payment of claims against the account and for no other purpose, except that an account established as an independent private entity pursuant to this subsection may issue such dividends to its members as are approved by the superintendent. [2003, c. 671, Pt. A, §12 (AMD).]
J. The Superintendent of Insurance shall adopt rules to administer and effectuate the intent of this subsection. Rules adopted pursuant to this subsection are routine technical rules as defined in Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter 2-A. [2003, c. 315, §2 (NEW).]
K. In the event of dissolution of an account established as an instrumentality of the State pursuant to this subsection, all assets remaining after the satisfaction of all outstanding claims must be distributed to the Treasurer of State to be included in the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. [2003, c. 671, Pt. A, §12 (AMD).]
L. With the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance, a self-insurance reinsurance account may create one or more protected cells under its plan of operation for the purpose of reinsuring obligations of group self-insurers that are organized under the laws of another state. Any protected cell and all participating group self-insurers and their member employers are subject to the jurisdiction and oversight of the Superintendent of Insurance with respect to all matters relating to their participation on the account.
(1) Any out-of-state self-insurer that participates in the account may do so only through participation in a protected cell. An employer or group authorized by the Superintendent of Insurance to self-insure its Maine liabilities pursuant to this section is considered an out-of-state insurer to the extent that it is reinsuring out-of-state liabilities beyond the scope of its Maine self-insurance plan.
(2) The establishment of protected cells under this paragraph is a pilot project, limited to at most 2 protected cells, and approval of a protected cell or of a group self-insurer to participate in a protected cell is at the discretion of the Superintendent of Insurance. The Superintendent of Insurance may adopt rules pursuant to paragraph J to establish the terms and conditions of the pilot project, including criteria for the minimum and maximum size of a protected cell.
(3) A separate account must be established for each protected cell. All contributions from participants in a protected cell must be deposited into the protected cell account. Funds in a protected cell account may be used only for the payment of claims and expenses associated with that protected cell, which may include a reasonable administrative fee paid periodically into the general account. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subsection, participants in a protected cell are not liable for claims or expenses of any other protected cell or of the general account, and the general account is not liable for the claims of any protected cell or any expenses associated with such claims or otherwise specifically attributable to the protected cell.
(4) The minimum funding level for any protected cell may not be lower than the minimum funding level, calculated in accordance with the plan of operation and subject to paragraph E, that would apply to the general account with the same loss exposure and duration of operation. If the protected cell account falls short of the minimum funding level at any time, the reinsurance account must assess all protected cell participants. If a participating group self-insurer fails to pay any assessment in full when due, the reinsurance account must assess the group's member employers. All assessments are enforceable by the Superintendent of Insurance through an adjudicatory proceeding under the Maine Administrative Procedure Act or through an action in the Superior Court.
(5) Each protected cell must have its own board of directors, at least 2/3 of whom must be chosen by the protected cell's participants. The plan of operation shall provide for a reasonable allocation of authority between the reinsurance account's board of directors and the protected cell's board of directors.
(6) No later than April 1st of each year, each reinsurance account with one or more protected cells must pay a regulatory assessment to the Bureau of Insurance from each protected cell account in the amount of 11/100 of 1% of the total standard reinsurance premium for the preceding calendar year for all participants in the protected cell for the level of coverage provided by the reinsurance account.
(7) All groups participating in a protected cell must provide the reinsurance account and the Superintendent of Insurance with financial and actuarial information sufficient to evaluate loss exposure and financial condition. All information provided to the superintendent by protected cell participants and their member employers is confidential pursuant to subsection 15. All protected cell participants and their member employers must authorize their domiciliary regulator to provide any information requested by the superintendent, which is confidential to the extent provided in Title 24-A, section 216, subsection 5.
(8) In evaluating the risk exposure of an out-of-state group self-insurer and in determining whether groups from different states may participate in the same protected cell, the reinsurance account and the Superintendent of Insurance shall consider any relevant differences in the states' regulatory frameworks for group self-insurance and in their workers' compensation benefit laws.
(9) A group self-insurer may not become a participant in a protected cell unless the group and all of its member employers have provided written acknowledgments to the Superintendent of Insurance that they are jointly and severally liable for the obligations of the protected cell and are subject to the jurisdiction of the superintendent and courts of the State for the enforcement of those obligations.
(10) Any disputes between self-insured members, the self-insurance reinsurance account and any protected cell, including but not limited to any dispute arising out of or relating to any enforcement order or mechanism imposed by the Superintendent of Insurance, must be resolved in this State and pursuant to the laws of this State. [2009, c. 232, §2 (NEW).]
[ 2013, c. 172, §1 (AMD) .]
5. Group self-insurance; participation.  Participation in a group self-insurance plan is governed by the following provisions.
A. Any group of employers may adopt a plan for self-insurance, as a group, for the payment of compensation under this Act to their employees. A group may not be approved to operate a self-insurance plan in the form of a corporation, partnership or limited liability company. Under a group self-insurance plan the group shall assume the liability of all the employers within the group and pay all compensation for which the employers are liable under this chapter. When the plan is adopted, the group shall furnish satisfactory proof to the Superintendent of Insurance of its financial ability to pay the compensation for the employers in the group and its revenues, their source and assurance of continuance. The superintendent shall require the deposit with the board of such securities as the superintendent determines necessary of the kind prescribed in subsection 9 or the filing of a bond issued by a surety company authorized to transact business in this State, in an amount to be determined to secure its liability to pay the compensation of each employer as above provided in accordance with subsection 9. The surety bond must be approved as to form by the superintendent. The superintendent may also require that any agreements, contracts and other pertinent documents relating to the organization of the employers in the group be filed with the superintendent at the time the application for group self-insurance is made. The application must be on a form prescribed by the superintendent. The superintendent has the authority to deny the application of the group to pay the compensation for failure to satisfy any applicable requirement of this section. The superintendent shall approve or disapprove an application within 90 days. The group qualifying under this paragraph is referred to as a self-insurer. [1995, c. 594, §2 (AMD).]
B. An employer participating in group self-insurance is not relieved from the liability for compensation prescribed by this chapter, except by the payment of the compensation by the group self-insurer or by the employer. As between the employee and the group self-insurer, notice to or knowledge of the occurrence of the injury on the part of the employer is deemed notice or knowledge, as the case may be, on the part of the group self-insurer; jurisdiction of the employer is, for the purpose of this chapter, jurisdiction of the group self-insurer and the group self-insurer is in all things bound by and subject to the orders, findings, decisions or awards rendered against the participating employer for the payment of compensation under this chapter. The insolvency or bankruptcy of a participating employer does not relieve the group self-insurer from the payment of compensation for injuries or death sustained by an employee during the time the employer was a participant in group self-insurance. The group self-insurer shall promptly notify the Superintendent of Insurance and the board, on a prescribed form, of the addition of any participating employer or employers. The approval of the superintendent is not necessary in order to add participating employers to the group self-insurer. Notice of termination of a participating employer is not effective until at least 10 days after notice of that termination, on a prescribed form, has been filed in the offices of the superintendent and the board or sent to both offices by registered mail. The group self-insurer shall give notice of the termination of any participating member to all other participating members at least quarterly each year. Written notice must be given to any new participating member at the time of admission that the specific membership of the group and its members as prescribed in this section is not affected by the group's failure to provide its members with prior or immediate notice of changes in the membership of the group if notice is given at least quarterly, as long as the termination or admission of members was effected in compliance with all group agreements and bylaws and this section and the rules adopted pursuant to it. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
C. Each group self-insurer, in its application for self-insurance, shall set forth the names and addresses of its officers, directors, trustees and general manager. Notice of any change in the officers, directors, trustees or general manager must be given to the Superintendent of Insurance and the board within 10 days of the change. An officer, director, trustee or employee of the group self-insurer may not represent or participate directly or indirectly on behalf of an injured worker or the worker's dependents in any workers' compensation proceeding. All employees of employers participating in group self-insurance are deemed to be included under the group self-insurance plan. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
D. If for any reason the status of a group self-insurer under this paragraph is terminated, the securities, the surety bond, the letter of credit or the deposit required by this section continues to be held by the Superintendent of Insurance or Treasurer of State and remains subject to the control of the board until all claims secured by the securities, surety bond, letter of credit or deposit have been discharged. When all such claims have been discharged or after such period as the Superintendent of Insurance determines proper, the superintendent may accept in lieu thereof, and for the additional purpose of securing such further and future contingent liability as may arise from prior injuries to workers and be incurred by reason of any change in the condition of such workers warranting the board making subsequent awards for payment of additional compensation, a policy of insurance furnished by the group self-insurer, its successor or assigns or other entity carrying on or liquidating such self-insurance group. The policy must be in a form approved by the superintendent and issued by any insurance company licensed to issue this class of insurance in the State. It may only be issued for a single complete premium payment in advance by the group self-insurer. It must be given in an amount determined by the superintendent and when issued is noncancellable for any cause during the continuance of the liability secured and so covered. [2011, c. 180, §2 (AMD).]
E. The Superintendent of Insurance may provide for the administration of this section relating to self-insurance in the manner prescribed in Title 24-A, section 212. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
F. If an employer is a partnership or a sole proprietorship and is a member of a self-insurance group associated pursuant to this section, the employer may elect to include as an employee any member of the partnership or owner of the sole proprietorship for purposes of obtaining workers' compensation coverage under this Act. In the event of such an election, the electing employer shall serve upon the group self-insurance association written notice naming the partner or sole proprietor to be covered, and an election is deemed not to have been made within this Act until such notice has been given. By making such an election, the partnership member or sole proprietor is deemed to have stipulated that for premium payment purposes the annual salary or wage of the electing partnership member or sole proprietor is the average weekly wage in the State as computed by the Department of Labor multiplied by 52 and rounded to the nearest $100. The assumed average annual wage must be adjusted as of July 1st using the average weekly wage from the prior calendar year. [1995, c. 560, Pt. G, §27 (AMD).]
G. Fee schedules applicable to group self-insurers are those set forth in Title 24-A, section 601. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
H. Each group self-insurer shall record its loss expense and experience in accordance with Title 24-A, section 2323. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
I. Annual examinations of each group self-insurer, as required by the Superintendent of Insurance, must be performed by public accountants acceptable to the superintendent and reports must be rendered to the superintendent within a reasonable period, as determined by the superintendent, subsequent to the group self-insurers elected fiscal year. The examinations must be conducted pursuant to generally accepted accounting principles, as they are consistent with precepts prescribed by the superintendent, that place sound values on assets and liabilities of group self-insurers. Other examinations of the affairs, transactions, accounts, records and assets of each group self-insurer and of any person as to any matter relevant to the financial affairs of the group self-insurer must be conducted as often as the superintendent determines advisable. The expense of examination of a group self-insurer must be borne by the group that is examined. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
J. In any fiscal year, a group self-insurer may not be required to obtain aggregate reinsurance with a policy limit that exceeds a multiple of 1.5 of its annual standard workers' compensation premium for that fiscal year. The Superintendent of Insurance may set lower policy limits for aggregate reinsurance when, in the superintendent's judgment, lower limits may be prudent. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
K. Upon approval by the Superintendent of Insurance, a group self-insurer may dedicate a portion of its unimpaired surplus to increase its self-insured retention level under the aggregate reinsurance policy by an amount equal to the amount of surplus so dedicated. The superintendent before granting approval shall consider among other factors:
(1) The level of alternate revenues available to the group self-insurer to cover the further assumed costs; and
(2) The adequacy of the fund's surplus to meet obligations of the group self-insurer.
At the expiration of a period of 10 calendar days after the superintendent has received a plan for the dedication of a portion of the unimpaired surplus of a group self-insurer to increase its self-insured retention level and any additional information the superintendent has determined necessary, the plan is deemed approved unless prior to the expiration of that time period it has been affirmatively approved or disapproved by the superintendent. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
L. Upon the filing of a plan that meets the approval of the Superintendent of Insurance, a group self-insurer may be authorized to issue subordinated loan certificates, the proceeds of which must be made part of the group self-insurer's surplus account and be available as other surplus funds for dedication to increase the self-insured retention level. To the extent that the proceeds of these loan certificates are utilized by a group self-insurer to increase its self-insured retention in any fiscal year, the aggregate proceeds of the loan certificates so utilized may not exceed 25% of the annual standard premium for that fiscal year. The obligation to redeem these loan certificates after the proceeds of the loan certificates have been dedicated to increase the aggregate excess self-insured retention level of the group self-insurer is subordinate to covered claims and may not be redeemed after the dedication without the approval of the superintendent. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
[ 2011, c. 180, §2 (AMD) .]
6. Annual renewal; actuarial evaluation.  Renewal and actuarial evaluation are governed by this subsection.
A. Any approval granted by the Superintendent of Insurance to an individual self-insurer or group self-insurer must be for a term of not more than one year. A complete application for renewal of approval to self-insure must be submitted to the superintendent not less than 21 days prior to the self-insurer's renewal date, except that evidence of reinsurance coverage may be submitted up to 3 working days prior to renewal. Notwithstanding this paragraph, when a self-insurer has made a timely and complete application for renewal, the existing authorization does not expire until the renewal has been determined by the superintendent. A renewal application must contain: all reports, statements and other data required to be filed annually under rules adopted by the superintendent; copies of any proposed reinsurance contracts, binders or cover notes; evidence of security posted; notice of any changes in servicing arrangements; and notice of any change in control of the self-insurer and its effect, if any, on guarantees provided pursuant to subsection 3. The superintendent may refuse to grant or renew self-insurance approval based upon any of the following grounds:
(1) Failure to submit any information that is required by law or rule or is reasonably requested by the superintendent;
(2) Failure of a self-insurer to establish that it has met all applicable requirements of law or rule;
(3) Fraud or misrepresentation in the application; or
(4) Any ground upon which approval may be suspended or revoked as provided in subsection 13.
The effective date of any notice of nonrenewal under this subsection is on or after the date of the notice. A notice of nonrenewal under this subsection may not include nonrenewal for any approved period of self-insurance prior to the notice. [1995, c. 398, §3 (AMD).]
B. Each individual self-insured employer, except an employer utilizing an actuarially fully funded trust pursuant to subsection 3, is required to obtain an actuarial evaluation of undischarged claims and claims settlement liabilities at least once every 3 years, unless the requirement is waived by the superintendent. The superintendent may waive the triennial actuarial evaluation if the number of outstanding claims is not of sufficient volume to permit a credible actuarial analysis. This review and evaluation must be performed by a casualty actuary who is a member of the American Academy of Actuaries. Upon approval to self-insure, the Superintendent of Insurance shall indicate the deadline for that self-insurer to complete an actuarial review. In addition to this triennial review, the superintendent may require the reserves and liabilities of a self-insurer to be reviewed and evaluated as often as the superintendent determines necessary.
Any self-insurer that develops an imputed annual standard premium not exceeding $50,000 and demonstrates that it has provided security for its workers' compensation exposures in an amount that is at least 135% of its case-based claims reserves, as evaluated annually, is excused from providing an actuarial evaluation in any year in which these conditions are satisfied. For the purposes of this subsection, "case-based claims reserves" means undischarged claims that have arisen during the period of self-insurance and of which the employer has had formal notice. This exception may not be construed to limit the superintendent's authority to require an actuarial evaluation when the superintendent determines one is necessary. [1995, c. 594, §3 (AMD).]
C. Each individual self-insurer except a public employer shall demonstrate in its initial or renewal application that it has working capital adequate to its operating needs. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
D. When a self-insurer's reinsurance contract expires on a date other than the renewal date for its self-insurance approval, the self-insurer shall file evidence of any required reinsurance coverage no later than 3 working days before the date of expiration of its coverage. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
E. Each renewal application filed by an individual or group self-insurer that has secured its obligations in whole or part by maintaining a trust fund must include a certification that no political contributions have been made from the trust fund in violation of subsection 18. [2003, c. 424, §1 (NEW).]
[ 2003, c. 424, §1 (AMD) .]
7. Self-insurance.  "Self-insurance," as used in this section, means the system of securing compensation as provided in subsections 3 to 16.
[ 1993, c. 510, §2 (AMD) .]
8. Security deposit and reinsurance requirements for individual self-insurers.  The following security deposit and reinsurance requirements apply to individual self-insurers.
A. Each individual self-insurer shall post a bond, security deposit or letter of credit in an amount that, except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, is no less than the loss and loss adjustment expense portion of the annual standard premium, as defined in section 404, subsection 4, paragraph E, for the prospective fiscal coverage period plus outstanding incurred liabilities minus recoveries from all reinsurance and subrogation reduced to net collections. Outstanding incurred liabilities for an individual self-insurer must be developed to ultimate from a current actuarial evaluation of undischarged claims and claims settlement liabilities performed by a casualty actuary who is a member of the American Academy of Actuaries or its successor organization, except that if a current actuarial evaluation is not available the outstanding incurred liabilities may be developed from current case reserves by applying the ratio of ultimate loss and claim settlement reserves to current loss and claim settlement reserves from the most recent actuarial evaluation.
(1) A self-insurer's minimum required security level may not be less than $50,000.
(2) The minimum required security level for a self-insurer with consistently reported outstanding case reserves less than $500,000 is 25% of the annual standard premium for the prospective fiscal coverage period, plus outstanding incurred liabilities, minus recoveries from all reinsurance and subrogation reduced to net collections. Outstanding incurred liabilities may be estimated by applying a development ratio of 2.5 to current case reserves.
(3) An individual self-insurer may reduce its minimum required security level by an amount not to exceed the self-insurer's demonstrated working capital, as determined by the Superintendent of Insurance on the basis of a current audited statement of financial condition, as long as:
(a) The self-insurer has a tangible net worth equal to or in excess of $10,000,000;
(b) The self-insurer has had positive net earnings demonstrated by certified statements of financial condition audited by a certified public accountant for at least 3 of the 5 latest fiscal years, including one of the 2 most recent years, and its mean annual earnings for the 5 latest fiscal years are at least equal to the normal annual premium for the prospective fiscal coverage period, or it was eligible to make an alternative election, under Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No. 106, Employers' Accounting for Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions, that would have otherwise satisfied these earnings requirements;
(c) The reduction does not exceed $10,000,000 and does not reduce the minimum required security level below $100,000; and
(d) The self-insurer is not organized as a sole proprietorship, partnership or limited liability company, except that the superintendent may authorize a limited liability company to deduct demonstrated working capital from its minimum required security level by rules adopted under this section. Rules adopted pursuant to this section are routine technical rules pursuant to Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter II-A.
(3-A) An individual self-insurer that is a transmission and distribution utility as defined in Title 35-A, section 102, subsection 20-B with an investment grade credit rating may reduce its required security level by up to $10,000,000, as long as:
(a) The self-insured transmission and distribution utility has a tangible net worth equal to or in excess of $200,000,000;
(b) The self-insured transmission and distribution utility has had positive net earnings demonstrated by certified statements of financial condition audited by a certified public accountant for at least 3 of the 5 latest fiscal years, including one of the 2 most recent years, and its mean annual earnings for the 5 latest fiscal years are at least equal to the normal annual premium for the prospective fiscal coverage period, or it was eligible to make an alternative election, under Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No. 106, Employers' Accounting for Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions, that would have otherwise satisfied these earnings requirements;
(c) The self-insured transmission and distribution utility has credit facility equal to or in excess of twice its outstanding workers' compensation liabilities; and
(d) The reduction does not exceed $10,000,000 and does not reduce the minimum required security level below $100,000.
(4) With the superintendent's approval, affiliated individual self-insurers may post security on a consolidated basis.
Within 30 days after receiving notice from the superintendent, the self-insurer shall post the required bond, security deposit or letter of credit. This deadline may be extended by the superintendent for good cause, but may not exceed one year from the deadline for compliance as stated in the notice given to the self-insurer.
A bond, security deposit or letter of credit in excess of the amount prescribed by this subsection may be required if the superintendent determines that the self-insurer has experienced a deterioration in financial condition that adversely affects the self-insurer's ability to pay expected losses.
A judgment creditor other than a claimant for benefits under this Act does not have a right to levy upon the self-insurer's assets held in deposit pursuant to this paragraph. [2003, c. 38, §1 (AMD).]
B. All individual self-insurers shall maintain specific reinsurance unless the Superintendent of Insurance, in the superintendent's discretion, waives such a requirement. Specific reinsurance must generally have a limit of at least $2,000,000. Higher limits may be required for those businesses with a high risk of multiple injury from a single occurrence. The retention underlying specific reinsurance policies must be the lowest retention generally available for businesses of similar size and exposure, but may, at the superintendent's discretion, be established at higher levels consistent with the employer's claims experience and financial condition.
All individual self-insurers shall maintain aggregate reinsurance unless the superintendent, in the superintendent's discretion, waives this requirement. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
C. The Superintendent of Insurance may adopt rules establishing specific requirements applicable to security deposits and reinsurance, including, but not limited to, provisions governing standards for waiver of reinsurance, use of trusts in lieu of security deposits and release or application of deposit funds. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
[ 2003, c. 38, §1 (AMD) .]
9. Acceptable deposit funds or investments for trust funds.  The following requirements apply to assets deposited or held in trust as security for an individual or group self-insurer under this section.
A. In addition to cash, the deposit funds or permissible investments for trust funds acceptable to the Superintendent of Insurance as a security deposit are:
(1) Bonds, notes and bills that are issued by and are the direct obligation of the United States Treasury;
(2) Bonds issued or guaranteed by United States government agencies;
(3) Commercial paper rated as "P-1" by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. or "A-1" or better by Standard and Poor's Corporation or the rating equivalent of either by any other nationally recognized statistical rating agency;
(4) Money market funds rated "AAm" or "AAm-G" or better by Standard and Poor's Corporation or the rating equivalent of any other nationally recognized statistical rating agency;
(5) Certificates of deposit issued by a duly chartered commercial bank or thrift institution in the State protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation if the bank or institution possesses assets of at least $100,000,000 and maintains a Tier 1 capital ratio equal to or greater than 6%;
(6) Bonds that are issued by corporations or municipalities and that are rated "A2" or better by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. or "A" or better by Standard and Poor's Corporation or the rating equivalent of either by any other nationally recognized statistical rating agency; and
(7) Other investments specifically approved by the superintendent. [2015, c. 59, §1 (NEW).]
B. Investments must be diversified in a prudent manner to ensure that funds are maintained at a sufficient level to discharge workers' compensation obligations incurred by the employer pursuant to this Title as those obligations become due and payable. At least 30% of the portfolio, as measured at market value, must consist of cash, direct obligations of the United States Treasury, commercial paper, money market funds or certificates of deposit. No more than 40% of the portfolio, as measured at market value, may be invested in bonds issued or generated by United States government agencies, with no more than 10% of the portfolio invested in a single issuer. No more than 50% of the portfolio, as measured at market value, may be invested in corporate or municipal bonds, with no more than 5% of the portfolio invested in a single issuer. No more than 25% of the corporate bond portion of the portfolio, as measured at market value, may be invested in a single industry, as defined by the North American Industry Classification System of the United States Department of Commerce, United States Census Bureau. [2015, c. 59, §1 (NEW).]
C. If the portfolio no longer meets the requirements of this subsection as a result of a rating downgrade or a change in financial condition or market value, the value may not be considered in determining whether a deposit or trust has surplus available for distribution, and the superintendent has discretion to discount or disallow the value of the investment for purposes of determining whether additional security is required. In the case of a portfolio that no longer meets the diversification requirements of paragraph B, the self-insurer may designate the specific assets to be disallowed, as long as the remaining assets meet the requirements of paragraph B. [2015, c. 59, §1 (NEW).]
[ 2015, c. 59, §1 (RPR) .]
10. Form of reinsurance contracts.  All reinsurance contracts issued or renewed after the effective date of this subsection must be issued by companies that meet the requirements of subsection 11 and must name the self-insurer and the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association as coinsureds to the extent of their respective interests. These reinsurance contracts must recognize the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association's rights of recovery, within the terms of coverage provided by the contract, for payments made by the association to or on behalf of claimants regarding covered claims and for claims in the course of settlement, the value of which when reduced to payments will create an obligation on the part of the reinsurance carrier to reimburse the association to the extent of funds disbursed by the association to discharge covered claims. The requirements of this subsection apply to any reinsurance contract issued to any individual or group self-insurer as part of a self-insurance program approved for use within this State and are in addition to any other requirement applicable to reinsurance contracts imposed by law or rule.
Reinsurance contracts must further specify that the reinsurance carrier and the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association may enter into agreements on the terms of settlement and distribution of benefits accruing to claimants within the limits of the authority of the parties to make settlements with respect to any coverage year.
To the extent that the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association succeeds to a recovery of benefits from any reinsurance carrier on behalf of claimants, those benefits must be timely disbursed by the association to or on behalf of claimants as they become due and payable pursuant to this Act. Funds recovered under reinsurance contracts on behalf of claimants must be applied consistent with the terms of coverage under the contract to loss, loss adjustment expense and attorneys' fees that are payable under this Act.
[ 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF) .]
11. Qualifications for reinsurance carriers.  A workers' compensation contract or policy issued after the effective date of this section may not be recognized by the Superintendent of Insurance in considering the ability of an individual or group self-insurer to fulfill its financial obligations under this Act, unless the contract or policy is issued by an admitted insurance company or a reinsurance company that meets on a continuous basis the requirements of Title 24-A, chapter 9, subchapter III and the reinsurance company has been approved by the superintendent to issue in this State contracts of primary workers' compensation reinsurance, or by Lloyd's of London, a syndicate of unincorporated alien insurers that has established and maintains United States trust funds consistent with the requirements of Title 24-A, chapter 9, subchapter III. Each contract of primary workers' compensation reinsurance that is proposed for use in this State must be filed for approval in the manner set out in Title 24-A, section 2412. Insofar as is practicable, a contract so approved may be modified with less than 30 days advance filing notice if the superintendent determines the modifications suggested are not contrary to provisions of Title 24-A, section 2412, this Title or Bureau of Insurance Rule Chapter 250 and are necessary to effect required reinsurance coverage to authorize the self-insurer to operate a plan of workers' compensation self-insurance.
[ 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF) .]
12. Qualifications for claims personnel.  Persons who investigate, settle or negotiate the settlement of claims on behalf of self-insurers or employees of self-insurers are required to be licensed as insurance adjusters pursuant to Title 24-A, chapter 16.
[ 1997, c. 457, §54 (AMD) .]
13. Revocation or termination of self-insurance privilege.  The following may constitute grounds for denial of the right of any individual or group to continue the option of self-insurance:
A. Failure to comply with rules adopted by the Superintendent of Insurance or any provisions of this Act within 14 days of notice of such failure or such other time as may be established by order of the superintendent; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
B. Failure to comply with any lawful order of the Superintendent of Insurance; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
C. Repeated failure to comply with rules of the Superintendent of Insurance or any provisions of this Act; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
D. Committing an unfair or deceptive act or practice as defined in Title 24-A, sections 2151 to 2167; [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
E. Deterioration of financial condition adversely affecting the self-insurer's ability to pay expected losses; or [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
F. Failure to pay any lawful assessment of the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
Notwithstanding Title 5, section 10051, the superintendent is expressly granted the authority to revoke or suspend the right of an individual or group to continue the option to self-insure after a hearing held on not less than 7 days' notice in accordance with Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter IV and Title 24-A, chapter 3.
[ 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF) .]
14. Reportable events; termination of self-insurance authority; application for continuing self-insurance authority and nonrenewal or revocation order.  A self-insurer must report the occurrence of events as required by this subsection. An employer may elect to voluntarily terminate its authority to self-insure at any time or may make application for continuing authority to self-insure subject to the requirements of this subsection and any rules adopted by the Superintendent of Insurance. The superintendent may make a determination that an employer's authority to self-insure has terminated in accordance with this subsection and any rules adopted by the superintendent or may grant approval of an application for continuing self-insurance authority. For the purposes of this subsection, "employer" includes a successor employer assuming all workers' compensation liabilities of an approved self-insured employer as a result of the occurrence of one of the events in paragraph A.
A. In order for the superintendent to make a determination as to whether the occurrence of an event results in a termination of an individual employer's self-insured plan or results in a need for modification of the terms and conditions of the plan, an approved self-insurer must report any of the following events to the superintendent at least 45 days in advance of the event's occurrence, if known, or no later than 10 days after the event's occurrence, if not known in advance:
(1) The sale of 20% or more of the common stock or net assets of the self-insurer;
(2) A division of the business;
(3) A spin-off of the business;
(4) A leveraged buyout of the business;
(5) A reorganization of the business;
(6) A change in business form;
(7) An acquisition by or merger of the business with another entity;
(8) A change in a partnership agreement;
(9) A change in the membership or managers of a limited liability company;
(10) Dissolution of a partnership or a limited liability company;
(11) Cessation of business in the State; or
(12) Any other event affecting the ownership of the business or the structure of the business as identified in rules adopted by the superintendent.
Notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph, an employer that elects to apply to continue to self-insure under paragraph C must notify the superintendent 45 days in advance of the event's occurrence and must file an application for continuing authority to self-insure with the superintendent 30 days in advance of the event's occurrence. At the discretion of the superintendent and if good cause is shown, an employer may submit an application to continue to self-insure less than 30 days in advance of the event's occurrence. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
B. If a self-insured employer elects to terminate its self-insurance program, or a portion of its program, it must submit written notice and a written termination plan to the superintendent at least 30 days in advance of the proposed termination date. In the event that a self-insurer elects to terminate its approval in this State without filing a plan acceptable to the superintendent, the superintendent shall issue an order prescribing the terms and conditions of the termination. The termination plan must specify, but is not limited to, procedures for claims handling, reservation of assets or other security acceptable to the superintendent to be maintained in the State to discharge claims liabilities and other obligations under this Act and a description of how ultimate reserves were determined. The termination plan must contain a written agreement that the self-insurer continues to be subject to informational filings respecting changes in ownership, financial condition, and actuarial evaluation of claims, claims expense reserves and loss transfers when determined necessary by the superintendent to ensure that claims are adequately secured. The plan must also comply with the terms and conditions prescribed by rule by the superintendent. To protect the interests of claimants, the superintendent may require a further deposit to be held in trust by the Treasurer of State or may require full funding of workers' compensation liabilities. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
C. If the self-insured employer and any successor employer elect to continue to self-insure after the occurrence of an event in paragraph A, the employer and any successor employer must file notice of intent to continue to self-insure with an application for continuing authority to self-insure. In order to qualify to file for continuing self-insurance authority, any successor employer must assume 100% of the liabilities of the predecessor self-insured employer and must show that the business in the State remains substantially the same.
(1) The notice of intent and application to continue to self-insure must be received by the superintendent 30 days prior to the event's occurrence. The application must be made on a form approved by the superintendent and include the application fee required in Title 24-A, section 601. Within 7 days of receipt by the superintendent of the application to continue to self-insure, the employer and any successor employer must provide all information requested by the superintendent to allow the superintendent to make a determination under this section.
(2) While the application is pending, the superintendent may request any other information from the applicant determined by the superintendent to be necessary for review of the application. The applicant must promptly provide any additional information upon request in the most expeditious manner.
(3) While the application is pending and during the 30-day period following a denial of an application for continuing self-insurance authority, the employer and any successor employer must maintain the security and reinsurance as required by the employer's certificate of authority, must continue to comply with all other provisions of the employer's certificate of authority and must provide any additional security determined by the superintendent to be necessary under the circumstances. During the application period, the self-insurance authority of the employer continues, consistent with the terms and conditions of the employer's certificate of authority.
(4) Failure to provide the information when requested or failure to comply with the terms and conditions of the employer's certificate of authority or with any additional conditions prescribed by the superintendent will result in automatic termination of the employer's authority to self-insure and the issuance of an order by the superintendent that prescribes the terms and conditions of a termination plan. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
D. The superintendent shall notify the employer in writing within 30 days of receipt of all requested information whether the employer's application for continuing self-insurance authority is approved or denied. The superintendent's notice must specify the reasons for the denial or must specify the terms and conditions for continuing self-insurance authority as prescribed by this section and any rules adopted by the superintendent.
(1) In making a determination, the superintendent must consider, among other things, whether the successor employer has assumed 100% of the workers' compensation liabilities of the employer, whether the successor employer qualifies for self-insurance authority pursuant to subsection 3 and whether the successor employer maintains substantially the same business operations as the predecessor self-insured employer. The superintendent may also consider, among other things, whether the successor employer employs a substantially greater number of employees than did the predecessor employer. For purposes of this subparagraph, the successor employer has assumed 100% of the workers' compensation liabilities of the employer if the successor employer is unconditionally liable for payment of all benefits that are the obligations of the self-insured employer, regardless of date of injury and notwithstanding agreements for reimbursement from reinsurers or other entities agreeing to reimburse the successor employer for payments associated with self-insurance obligations.
(2) If the superintendent denies the application, the effective date of the termination is 30 days from the date of the superintendent's notice. The self-insurer may request a hearing on this decision within 30 days from the date of the notice. Upon a request for hearing, there is no automatic stay of the superintendent's decision, but the effective date of termination may be stayed by order of the superintendent. Prior to the effective date of the termination, the employer must file a termination plan consistent with paragraph B. After denial of an application, a successor employer may apply for authority to self-insure its workers' compensation obligations pursuant to this section. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
E. If at any time the superintendent determines that a self-insurer has failed to notify the superintendent of the occurrence of any of the events identified in paragraph A, the self-insurer may be subject to penalties pursuant to Title 24-A, section 12-A, if it is determined that the occurrence of the event had a substantial impact on the financial condition of the self-insured employer. As soon as the superintendent notifies the self-insurer that the superintendent has determined that the self-insurer failed to notify the superintendent of the occurrence of any of these events, the self-insurer must comply with this subsection. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
F. If a self-insurer's approval is revoked or not renewed pursuant to subsection 6 or 13, the superintendent must issue an order that prescribes terms and conditions related to the termination of the plan. The terms of the order must conform to, but need not be limited to, the requirements of paragraph B. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
G. Any order issued pursuant to this subsection, including an order directing a self-insurer to produce relevant information, may be enforced as provided by Title 24-A, section 214. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
H. A self-insurer approved by the superintendent to continue self-insurance authority under paragraph D is not subject to assessments as a new member of the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. The self-insurer is subject to applicable annual assessments or postinsolvency assessments levied by the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
I. Rules adopted pursuant to this subsection are routine technical rules as defined in Title 5, chapter 375, subchapter II-A. [1995, c. 594, §6 (NEW).]
[ 1995, c. 594, §6 (RPR) .]
15. Confidentiality of information.  All written, printed or graphic matter or any mechanical or electronic data compilation from which information can be obtained, directly or after translation into a form susceptible of visual or aural comprehension, all information contained in the minutes of trustee meetings and all information relating to individual compensation cases, that a self-insurer is required to file with or make available to the superintendent under this section, section 404 or rules adopted pursuant to it are confidential and are not public records.
The confidential nature of this information does not limit or affect its use by the superintendent in administering this Act, including, but not limited to, communications with the service agent, the Workers' Compensation Board or the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association.
[ 1993, c. 349, §73 (AMD) .]
16. Registration of self-insurers.  Registration of self-insurers is governed as follows.
A. All employers claiming the status of self-insurer as defined by this Title shall apply for registration with the Bureau of Insurance on forms prescribed by the Superintendent of Insurance. The application must contain a statement identifying the employer as a self-insurer, which includes the legal organization and name of each self-insuring employer. The superintendent may require the submission of any further information the superintendent deems necessary in order to determine whether a self-insurer has been approved pursuant to this section. If an employer is unable to establish that it has been approved to act as a self-insurer, the superintendent shall deny the application for registration. Upon denial of registration, an employer may make application for approval to act as a self-insurer in accordance with all requirements of this Act and the rules adopted pursuant to this Act. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
B. On January 1st of each year, the Superintendent of Insurance shall promulgate an official list of self-insurers that are approved and registered as of that date and the list of self-insurers must be forwarded to the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association. The superintendent shall add to the list at any time during the year the name or names of any self-insurer or self-insurers the superintendent has approved and registered subsequent to the promulgation of the list and shall similarly delete the name or names of any self-insurer or self-insurers whose authority to self-insure has been terminated. Additions to or deletions from the official list of self-insurers must be forwarded to the Maine Self-Insurance Guarantee Association when made. Failure to become registered pursuant to this subsection terminates an employer's authority to self-insure under this Act. [1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF).]
[ 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §8 (NEW); 1991, c. 885, Pt. A, §§9-11 (AFF) .]
17. Report required.  In order to comply with Title 26, section 61, subsection 1-A, on or before March 1st of each year, every individual workers' compensation self-insurer and workers' compensation group self-insurer shall file a report with the superintendent showing the amount of total actual paid workers' compensation losses and the total actual paid workers' compensation medical payments for the previous calendar year.
[ 1997, c. 126, §9 (NEW) .]
18. Prohibition against using funds for political contributions.  Once deposited into a trust fund created to comply with the requirements of this section, funds and assets may not be withdrawn for the purpose of making a contribution to a political candidate or political action committee required to file a report under Title 21-A, chapter 13, subchapter 2 or 4.
[ 2003, c. 424, §2 (NEW) .]
SECTION HISTORY
1991, c. 885, §A8 (NEW). 1991, c. 885, §§A9-11 (AFF). RR 1993, c. 1, §141 (COR). 1993, c. 349, §73 (AMD). 1993, c. 491, §1 (AMD). 1993, c. 510, §§1,2 (AMD). 1995, c. 36, §1 (AMD). 1995, c. 150, §1 (AMD). 1995, c. 277, §1 (AMD). 1995, c. 398, §§2-4 (AMD). 1995, c. 560, §G27 (AMD). 1995, c. 594, §§2-6 (AMD). 1995, c. 619, §7 (AMD). 1997, c. 126, §§7-9 (AMD). 1997, c. 457, §54 (AMD). 1999, c. 113, §30 (AMD). 1999, c. 790, §A53 (AMD). 2001, c. 44, §14 (AFF). 2001, c. 48, §§1,11 (AMD). 2001, c. 48, §§2,14 (AFF). 2001, c. 224, §1 (AMD). 2003, c. 38, §1 (AMD). 2003, c. 315, §§1,2 (AMD). 2003, c. 424, §§1,2 (AMD). 2003, c. 671, §§A11,12 (AMD). 2005, c. 98, §§1,2 (AMD). 2007, c. 75, §1 (AMD). 2009, c. 232, §2 (AMD). 2011, c. 98, §1 (AMD). 2011, c. 180, §§1, 2 (AMD). 2013, c. 172, §§1, 2 (AMD). 2015, c. 59, §1 (AMD).