Maine Revised Statutes

§3113-A. License required; limitations and exceptions

A person may not practice or profess to be authorized to practice as a physical therapist in this State or use the words "physical therapist" or the letters "P.T." or other words or letters to indicate that the person using those words or letters is a licensed physical therapist unless that person is licensed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter. [1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW).]

After one year from the effective date of this chapter, a person may not act or profess to be able to act as a physical therapist assistant in this State or use the words "physical therapist assistant" or the letters "P.T.A." or other words or letters to indicate that the person using those words or letters is a licensed physical therapist assistant unless that person is licensed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter. [1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW).]

Nothing in this chapter may be construed as authorizing a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant, licensed or not licensed, to practice medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, chiropractic or any other form of healing, except that physical therapists may utilize manipulative techniques if practiced within the scope of their profession. Physical therapists may not apply manipulative thrust to the vertebrae of the spine except upon consultation with, and referral by, a duly licensed doctor of medicine, surgery, chiropractic or osteopathy. A licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant may not administer drugs except upon the referral of a duly licensed doctor of medicine, surgery, osteopathy, podiatry or dentistry, and may not use roentgen rays or radium or use electricity for surgical purposes. A licensed physical therapist assistant may act only under the direction of a physical therapist licensed to practice in this State. [1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW).]

When treating a patient without referral from a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, podiatry, dentistry or chiropractic, the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant is subject to the following requirements. [1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW).]

1. No medical diagnosis.  A physical therapist or physical therapist assistant may not make a medical diagnosis. The physical therapist or physical therapist assistant shall refer to a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, podiatry, dentistry or chiropractic a patient whose physical condition, either at the initial evaluation or during subsequent treatment, the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant determines to be beyond the scope of the practice of the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant.
[ 1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW) .]
2. No improvement.  If no improvement in the patient is documented by the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant within 30 days of initiation of treatment, the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant shall refer the patient to a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, podiatry, dentistry or chiropractic.
[ 1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW) .]
3. Length of treatment.  For treatment required beyond 120 days, the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant shall consult with, or refer the patient to, a licensed doctor of medicine, surgery, osteopathy, podiatry, dentistry or chiropractic. The physical therapist or physical therapist assistant shall document the action taken.
[ 1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW) .]

An employer is not liable under Title 39-A, section 206 for charges for services of a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant unless the employee has been referred to that practitioner by a licensed doctor of medicine, surgery, osteopathy, chiropractic, podiatry or dentistry. [1991, c. 885, Pt. E, §41 (AMD); 1991, c. 885, Pt. E, §47 (AFF).]

SECTION HISTORY
1991, c. 178, §3 (NEW). 1991, c. 885, §E41 (AMD). 1991, c. 885, §E47 (AFF).